When [documentarian James] Schneider contacted DCPL, Casto says, he said he’d come across various punk collections in people’s houses while making his in-progress documentary with Paul Bishow, and some of those pieces of the past could be in danger of being lost. It seemed like a smart idea to house vulnerable objects like flyers, records and photographs in a venue that was both secure and accessible to the public. Casto, of course, agreed. “That’s the gospel of preservation: making sure these things don’t disappear,” she says.

D.C. Punk: From Your Basement To D.C. Public Library, Ally Schweizer

Great write up on our D.C. Punk Archives project from bandwith!

.


Can you really play a 3D printed instrument?

MLK’s “3D Print of the Month" will try to answer that question on August 14th. In the meantime, vote on which instrument you want to see printed! 


Before the new building that would become the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library was conceived, this plan for a 3-sided addition to the Carnegie Library at Mt. Vernon Square (then the Central Branch of D.C. Public Library) was considered.

Read more about this design on the front page of the April 11, 1952 Evening Star—accessible at http://dclibrary.org/node/214 with your library card!

Municipal Architect M. A. Coe’s sketch of the proposed addition from the Evening Star, April 11 1952 (above) and photograph of our Central Library, date unknown from DCPL Special Collections, Historic Image Collection (below)


DC Public Library has a new database, IndieFlix.
 Find and stream thousands of award-winning independent movies, shorts, documentaries and web series from major film festivals from around the world. Note:  These films are not rated by the MPAA, so viewer discretion is advised.
There are a lot of films available in this database, including classics like Night of the Living Dead and Psycho. It also includes TV series like Beverly Hillbillies, Dragnet, and The Roy Rogers Show. Be sure to check out the animated shorts as well!
Indieflix has apps for both Roku and Xbox, enabling you to easily stream to your TV.

DC Public Library has a new database, IndieFlix.

Find and stream thousands of award-winning independent movies, shorts, documentaries and web series from major film festivals from around the world. Note:  These films are not rated by the MPAA, so viewer discretion is advised.

There are a lot of films available in this database, including classics like Night of the Living Dead and Psycho. It also includes TV series like Beverly Hillbillies, Dragnet, and The Roy Rogers Show. Be sure to check out the animated shorts as well!

Indieflix has apps for both Roku and Xbox, enabling you to easily stream to your TV.


daniellemohlman:

Took a cue from megwest and checked out a bunch of ebooks in preparation for my trip to California. Thanks to the dcpubliclibrary, I have plenty of reading for my flight, layover, and breezy summer nights. I’m being way too ambitious about the reading I’m going to get done over the next five days, but things move at a different pace in my hometown. I’m sure there will be plenty of time for books. 

The only thing better than loading up on e-books before a trip is running out during it and realizing you can just log on and get more!

daniellemohlman:

Took a cue from megwest and checked out a bunch of ebooks in preparation for my trip to California. Thanks to the dcpubliclibrary, I have plenty of reading for my flight, layover, and breezy summer nights. I’m being way too ambitious about the reading I’m going to get done over the next five days, but things move at a different pace in my hometown. I’m sure there will be plenty of time for books. 

The only thing better than loading up on e-books before a trip is running out during it and realizing you can just log on and get more!


Summer afternoons with bubbles = hands-on fun.  Here are some ideas for kids (and kids-at-heart) to get started exploring the art, science & silliness of bubbles:

(Thanks to Alison O. for providing info. & inspiration for our upcoming program celebrating bubbles). 


yasimon:


Submitted by: stories-to-live-by

Pretty much

If you’re like me, your reading list on Overdrive is both ambitious and infinite. Free e-books that can be read on a Kindle, tablet, or right in your browser—libraries are here to enable your reading habits, after all! All you need is a library card number to sign in and start your Wish List.

yasimon:

Submitted by: stories-to-live-by

Pretty much

If you’re like me, your reading list on Overdrive is both ambitious and infinite. Free e-books that can be read on a Kindle, tablet, or right in your browser—libraries are here to enable your reading habits, after all! All you need is a library card number to sign in and start your Wish List.

(via thedigitallibrarian)


uispeccoll:

Happy Birthday Beatrix Potter!

Today we celebrate the 148th birthday of the famous children’s author, Beatrix Potter, who is mainly known for writing The Tale of Peter Rabbit. Here at the University of Iowa, we are fortunate enough to have a copy of one of the first printings of this charming tale, which according to our acquisition papers, was previously owned by Potter’s niece!

This particular book was printed in a grouping of 250, and is widely believed to have been done so in 1901. However, the acquisition papers accompanying this copy state that the author’s records say it was privately printed in 1900, and later issued in 1901. This copy is also interesting as it contains the later omitted pages showing how Peter Rabbit’s father met his demise by way of pie. 

Want to see the fully digitized version of this book? Click here!

Want to learn more about this and other Beatrix Potter books at Iowa? Click here

-Beatrix Potter aficionado, Lindsay M.

PZ5.P86 T3

(via thedigitallibrarian)


thedigitallibrarian:

ebookporn:

Book Plates (get it?)

sooo cute!

thedigitallibrarian:

ebookporn:

Book Plates (get it?)

sooo cute!


amadansmound:

via bookporn:

Threats and Warnings on Bookplates
It was traditional, particularly before the invention of the printing press when books were all hand written manuscripts, to letter a curse into the book to prevent theft. Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem to have worked very well, as the books also had to be chained into place. Even chains had limited effect. Witness the many ancient libraries where there are still chains in place… but no books.
Here are a few examples:
Thys boke is one
And God’s curse another;
They that take the one
God geve them the other.
He who steals this book
may he die the death
may he be frizzled in a pan…
This present book legible in scripture
Here in this place thus tacched with a cheyn
Purposed of entent for to endure
And here perpetuelli stylle to remeyne
Fro eyre to eyre wherfore appone peyn
Of cryst is curs of faders and of moderes
Non of hem hens atempt it to dereyne
Whille ani leef may goodeli hange with oder.
Steal not this Book my honest Friend
For fear the Galows should be your hend,
And when you die the Lord will say
And wares the Book you stole away?
A variation on the same theme:
Steal not this book, my worthy friend
For fear the gallows will be your end;
Up the ladder, and down the rope,
There you’ll hang until you choke;
Then I’ll come along and say -
"Where’s that book you stole away?"
From the Monastery of San Pedro, Barcelona, a blanket curse for the entire library…(I really wish this one existed, but unfortunately, it appears that it is apocryphal — there is no monastery in San Pedro. It’s so nasty though that I include it anyway.)
For him that Stealeth a Book from this Library,
Let it change into a Serpent in his hand & rend him.
Let him be struck with Palsy, & all his Members blasted.
Let him languish in Pain crying aloud for Mercy,
Let there be no Surcease to his Agony till he sink to Dissolution.
Let Bookworms gnaw his Entrails in token of the Worm that dieth not,
When at last he goeth to his final Punishment,
Let the flames of hell consume him for ever & aye.”

(source: Littera Scripta).

Lew Jaffe, from Confessions of a Bookplate Junkie, shared his collection of bookplate threats and warnings done by different artists.

1. Lloyd Douglas. 2. Marion Nutt. 3.  Stanley Dressler Lovegrove. 4. Malcolm M. Ferguson. 5. Philip Reed. 6. Artist unknown.

"I should warn you, however, that I have several volumes devoted to curses for people who don’t return books.” “I’d like to borrow those, too.” ― Steven Brust (Morrolan e’Drien, Vlad Taltos; Dragon)