smithsonianlibraries:

In anticipation of Owl Awareness Day (August 4), we offer some slightly cartoony illustrations of these fascinating members of the genus Strix.

Images taken from Captain Thomas Brown’s “Illustrations of the American ornithology of Alexander Wilson and Charles Lucian Bonaparte" (1835).

These are a hoot!  (sorry/not sorry)


ddotdc:

WMATA planning map, dated March 1, 1968 and last revised by the WMATA Board on June 11, 1970

Please view a full-size, searchable version of the map. (Navigational tools are at the bottom of the map.)

On March 1, 1968, WMATA officially adopted a 97.2 mile regional system in the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia. On February 7, 1969, WMATA revisited the rapid rail plan and relocated three of the stations, calling instead for 97.7 miles of track. The total system cost was $2.5 billion ($15.9 billion in today’s dollars) consisting of $835 million of revenue bonds issued by WMATA, $1.1 billion in federal funding, and $573.5 million from local sources. On June 11, 1970, the WMATA Board adopted a realignment of 2.5 miles of a mid-city route to better serve the city center. This revised version is posted above. 

Metro originally had a future route planned to Dulles Airport—the final destination of Phase 2 of the soon-to-open Silver Line—the first half of which (to McLean, Tysons, Greensboro, Spring Hill, and Wiehle-Reston) is scheduled to begin service on Saturday, July 26, 2014.

This version of WMATA’s planning map also features a different path for a route that would materialize as Metro’s Green Line. The proposed north-south route through the District was set to feature a station near Logan Circle and run north toward a terminus in Laurel, Md. An alternate route trajectory, which was then being studied by WMATA, ran up-and-down 7th Street NW and featured station locations near what are now the Mt Vernon Sq 7th St-Convention Center and Shaw-Howard U Metro Stations. 

According to this map, Metro also planned for a Metro line along a route that is similar to one followed by the proposed Columbia Pike streetcar in Arlington, Va 

Pro Tip: Note how the Metro Station names have changed over time.


A patron listens to a record on a turntable in the Music Division of the old DCPL Central Branch, 1961.  
We still have several thousand vinyl records for checkout at Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library!  If digital music’s more your thing, you can also download three songs a week and stream up to 3 hours of music daily with your DC Public Library card at dclibrary.freegalmusic.com.
Photo from the DCPL Archives, DC Public Library Special Collections

A patron listens to a record on a turntable in the Music Division of the old DCPL Central Branch, 1961.  

We still have several thousand vinyl records for checkout at Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library!  If digital music’s more your thing, you can also download three songs a week and stream up to 3 hours of music daily with your DC Public Library card at dclibrary.freegalmusic.com.

Photo from the DCPL Archives, DC Public Library Special Collections


Bored This Summer?

Take a look at some of the fun (and mostly free) things you could be doing! 

Glow in the Dark Bowling 

Drive-In Movie with Homemade Cars 

Lawn Twister 

DIY Sidewalk Chalk 

Fight Backyard Crime with a DIY Superhero Cape

Check out these books from your local branch for more fun activities to keep you busy all summer long! 


figsandtea:

niiicethings:

“Noun is a playful artist’s book about words and their definitions. It is like an exquisite corpse with words.

Starting with 27 real English words, each word and its definition has been divided into two parts. By turning the pages, you get to mix and match the word halves to create humorous and nonsensical new words and meanings.

With over 700 different combinations, this book is the perfect item for bibiophiles, lexicographers, writers, and any lover of words.

Here are a few examples of words and definitions you can put together:

whisper + umbrella = whisbrella: A low sibilan utterance for sheltering one from rain and sun.
banana + onomatopoeia = bananpoeia: A large herbaceous perennial tropical plant that bears fruit imitating the sound of the thing or action signified.
muffin + tyrant = muffrant: A quick bread made of batter unrestrained by law or constitution.
nomenclature + ancestry = nomencestry: A system or set of names for things derived from, or possessed by, an ancestor or ancestors.”

I’M SORRY BUT 

muffin + tyrant = muffrant: A quick bread made of batter unrestrained by law or constitution.

THIS IS THE PINNACLE OF HUMAN INNOVATION ALL OTHER PLAYERS GO HOME.

Think of all the fun to be had!

(via victorvillelibrary)


Hope you’re surviving a D.C. summer.  We beat the heat with a library program inspired by “Frozen”.  A movie (accompanied by a spontaneous sing-along), chilly treats, a snowman relay race, and Olaf painting all helped to cool off on a hot day.


smithsonianlibraries:

Oh, hello there!
Friendly skeleton from Natural History for the use of schools and families (1864)

smithsonianlibraries:

Oh, hello there!

Friendly skeleton from Natural History for the use of schools and families (1864)


Going somewhere for summer vacation? Want to plan for a future vacation? DCPL has you covered! We’re getting new travel books all the time.

Just bring the sunscreen or the snow boots!

Going somewhere for summer vacation? Want to plan for a future vacation? DCPL has you covered! We’re getting new travel books all the time.

Just bring the sunscreen or the snow boots!


booksandhotchocolate:

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows was released seven years ago - July 21, 2007.

(via davenportlib)


Last week we celebrated the one year anniversary of the DCPL Digital Commons. Here’s a snapshot of what has happened in our first year!
Today, the 11,000 square-foot room at Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library is a popular place for entrepreneurs, start-up ventures, tech novices and students. Featuring 3-D printers, a book printing machine and more than 80 public computers, the Digital Commons is a pace where the public can connect, collaborate, co-work and learn new technology for free. 

Last week we celebrated the one year anniversary of the DCPL Digital Commons. Here’s a snapshot of what has happened in our first year!

Today, the 11,000 square-foot room at Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library is a popular place for entrepreneurs, start-up ventures, tech novices and students. Featuring 3-D printers, a book printing machine and more than 80 public computers, the Digital Commons is a pace where the public can connect, collaborate, co-work and learn new technology for free.